Traditions

Great Beer + Great Food = Atlanta, Georgia

San Francisco’s restaurant scene is known for three main types of cuisine: California, fusion, or both. Local and sustainable ingredients are routinely showcased; it’s common to find names of farms and vineyards featured alongside menu items. Special occasions and pop-up dining events are often an excuse to feature ingredients not otherwise available on the menu.

2018-12-07T17:13:04+00:00December 13th, 2018|Categories: Featured, Trends & Trails, West Coast|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Réveillon Dinners

Once you pass underneath the gateway arch at the foot of Federal Hill, you’re in Providence, Rhode Island’s Little Italy. Classic red sauce restaurants—some of which date back a century—line Atwells Avenue. In between, there are Italian specialty shops where dried sausages hang in the windows while songs by old crooners are piped out into the street. There are bocce courts, and an Italianate fountain in DePasquale Square with twinkling lights hanging overhead. This time of year, there’s also a huge Christmas tree illuminating the piazza. If you can catch it during one of the season’s first snowfalls, you’re not likely to find a more magical scene.

2018-12-05T21:46:02+00:00December 11th, 2018|Categories: Featured, South, Trends & Trails|Tags: , |0 Comments

The Feast of the Seven Fishes: West Coast

San Francisco’s restaurant scene is known for three main types of cuisine: California, fusion, or both. Local and sustainable ingredients are routinely showcased; it’s common to find names of farms and vineyards featured alongside menu items. Special occasions and pop-up dining events are often an excuse to feature ingredients not otherwise available on the menu.

2018-12-31T13:21:13+00:00December 6th, 2018|Categories: Featured, Trends & Trails, West Coast|Tags: , , |0 Comments

The Feast of the Seven Fishes: East Coast

Once you pass underneath the gateway arch at the foot of Federal Hill, you’re in Providence, Rhode Island’s Little Italy. Classic red sauce restaurants—some of which date back a century—line Atwells Avenue. In between, there are Italian specialty shops where dried sausages hang in the windows while songs by old crooners are piped out into the street. There are bocce courts, and an Italianate fountain in DePasquale Square with twinkling lights hanging overhead. This time of year, there’s also a huge Christmas tree illuminating the piazza. If you can catch it during one of the season’s first snowfalls, you’re not likely to find a more magical scene.

2018-12-05T20:28:10+00:00December 4th, 2018|Categories: Featured, Northeast, Trends & Trails|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Happy Thanksgiving

All of us here at Foodie Travel USA wish everyone a very happy Thanksgiving.  We’d like to take this opportunity to say a simple “thank you” for reading our posts. We hope you enjoy reading it as much as we enjoy putting it together and digging into flavors from coast to coast. While gearing up for the holiday, some of us stopped to reflect and share memories, insights and even some home-cooking tips from past Thanksgivings.

Whoopie Pies

Is it a cookie? A cake? A pie? A dessert sandwich? When it comes to the Maine whoopie pie, the answer is all of the above. In its most basic form, a whoopie pie is made up of two dark chocolate cake discs about the size of a hamburger bun with a layer of sweet, creamy, thick white frosting sandwiched between them. While the origins of the treat are up for debate, Maine claims to be the birthplace of its invention: The first whoopie pies came out of a Lewiston, Maine bakery in 1925.

2018-11-16T18:20:14+00:00November 20th, 2018|Categories: Featured, Northeast, Regions, Trends & Trails|Tags: |0 Comments

Pennsylvania Dutch Cuisine

I’ve been happily munching on Pennsylvania Dutch food for almost 50 years. My parents, and their parents before them, and on back, were born in central Pennsylvania, more or less ground zero for the cuisine. But trying to classify it isn’t easy, even for me. To begin with, the name is a misnomer: Pennsylvania Dutch fare has spread to Maryland, Virginia, Ohio and the Midwest. Tomake it more confusing, it’s not Dutch, either. The term evolved from the word “Deutsch,” the German word for German, which referred to German-speaking settlers who immigrated long ago to the Keystone State.

2018-11-15T14:04:27+00:00November 13th, 2018|Categories: Cuisines, Featured, Northeast, Pennsylvania Dutch, Regions|Tags: , |0 Comments

Thanksgiving Culinary Traditions

Dressing or stuffing? Pumpkin or sweet potato pie? Brine, baste, roast or deep-fry the bird? What you consider to be the “correct” answer to these and other culinary questions about our nation’s annual Thanksgiving feast depend largely on where you live.