South

Celebrating Crawfish

Crawfish season officially gets under way in early spring, and the bright red crustaceans usually remain in supply through June. The majority of crawfish in North America come from Louisiana, where rice fields are flooded in late summer to make way for the Cajun delicacy. Louisiana leads the nation in crawfish production, with crawfish farms producing more than 100 million pounds a year.

Deviled Eggs

What’s an American picnic, holiday gathering or family reunion without deviled eggs? The dish of boiled eggs sliced in half and stuffed with a yolk/mayonnaise filling has been an American staple for decades.But our love affair with deviled eggs wasn’t born in the New World. The dish’s origin dates back centuries to ancient Rome, Spain and other parts of Europe. Around the first century A.D., Romans enjoyed boiled eggs enhanced with spices, oil and wine. Spain began stuffing its eggs in the 13th century, adding flavors such as cilantro, pepper and a fermented fish sauce. Over the next few centuries stuffed egg fever spread across Europe, and what filled the boiled eggs ran the gamut from raisins to herbs.

Cooking New Orleans

Ever wondered what makes a perfect gumbo, crawfish etouffee or praline? Is the secret in the roux, sauce or seasoning? Find out by signing up for a cooking class in New Orleans, a Louisiana city with 300 years of culinary history.Established in 1980, the New Orleans School of Cooking promises fun, food and folklore. Classes are held in an 1800s renovated molasses warehouse in the French Quarter, where Cajun and Creole experts teach the basics of New Orleans cooking, blended with history and tall tales.

2019-04-18T16:34:02+00:00April 23rd, 2019|Categories: Cajun/Creole, Cuisines, Featured, Regions, South|Tags: , |0 Comments

5 Biscuits Worth a Road Trip

It was so flaky, buttery and light I had to suppress a loud “mmm” sound and the urge to stash a couple more delicious biscuits in to my purse for later.The experience of eating these heavenly light brown rounds was enhanced by sitting on the elegant porch of Mississippi’s Biscuit Queen herself, Chef Regina Charboneau, in Natchez, the Biscuit Capital of the World.As a child of the South and a lifelong biscuit lover, I am saddened by the state of what most places call a biscuit—they’re too often dry, tasteless and a waste of butter. But in my passionate pursuit of biscuit perfection, I’ve been lucky enough to encounter a few gems. Here are five biscuits worth a road trip.

2019-03-12T18:08:46+00:00March 14th, 2019|Categories: Cuisines, Featured, Regions, South, Southeast, Southern|Tags: , |0 Comments

Mama Jo’s

There just maybe isn’t a bigger little food town below the Mason-Dixon Line right now than Oxford, Mississippi. After all, this is the wee burg Southern Living dubbed “The South’s Best Food Town of 2018.” This is where James Beard Award-winning powerhouse John Currence built his empire, beginning in 1992 with City Grocery, famed for its dazzling shrimp and grits. It’s home to joints like Saint Leo, a 2017 James Beard "Best New Restaurant" semifinalist and purveyor of some of the country’s finest pizza, and chef Corbin Evans’ Oxford Canteen, beloved for gut-busting goodies like beef brisket grilled cheese.

2019-03-07T17:23:59+00:00March 12th, 2019|Categories: Featured, Producers & Purveyors, Regions, South|Tags: |0 Comments

March is National Peanut Month

You’ve probably heard the expression “working for peanuts.” Once considered animal fodder not fit for human consumption, the peanut is now a jewel in the crown of American culture and cuisine, and since March is National Peanut Month, we’re sharing the history of this tiny legume from “soup to nuts” as the saying goes.

2019-03-05T14:49:06+00:00March 5th, 2019|Categories: Featured, Producers & Purveyors, Regions, South, Southeast|Tags: , |0 Comments

Farm-to-Table

Farm-to-table dining is a term most popularly used to describe restaurants that source ingredients from local or regional producers—in such relationships, the executive chef proudly sources ingredients directly from food producers (from farmers to winemakers, ranchers to cheese makers, and so on). It’s an arrangement that can yield fresh results.

2019-02-25T15:55:02+00:00February 26th, 2019|Categories: Featured, Midwest, North, Northeast, Producers & Purveyors, Regions, South, Southeast|Tags: , |0 Comments

Salt

Salt is the stuff of life. It infuses our oceans, which average 3.5 percent salinity. It’s in our bodies, too: a typical-sized adult is comprised of around 100 grams of sodium chloride. Of course, salt has long been used for preserving and seasoning food, but it’s responsible for more than keeping grub fresh and flavorful. Humans need to ingest salt to live, something our ancestors must have guessed; salus, the Latin word for health, originated from sal(salt). Among other bodily functions, sodium helps our muscles to contract and our blood to circulate. It’s crucial to preventing dehydration, too.

2019-02-14T17:53:17+00:00February 19th, 2019|Categories: Featured, Producers & Purveyors, Regions, South, Southeast, West Coast|Tags: |0 Comments

10 Best Eats on the Natchez Trace Parkway

Beginning in Natchez, Mississippi and running 444 miles to Nashville, Tennessee (or vice versa), the Natchez Trace Parkway follows the historic Old Natchez Trace through three states. Initially used by Native Americans who were following the tracks of large game such as bison, the Trace became an important trail for settlers, slave traders and soldiers. Today, it makes for a gloriously scenic drive filled with opportunities to stop and sample some of the South’s best food.

2019-01-09T17:57:14+00:00January 10th, 2019|Categories: Featured, Regions, South, Southeast, Trends & Trails|Tags: , |0 Comments