South

10 Best Eats on the Natchez Trace Parkway

Beginning in Natchez, Mississippi and running 444 miles to Nashville, Tennessee (or vice versa), the Natchez Trace Parkway follows the historic Old Natchez Trace through three states. Initially used by Native Americans who were following the tracks of large game such as bison, the Trace became an important trail for settlers, slave traders and soldiers. Today, it makes for a gloriously scenic drive filled with opportunities to stop and sample some of the South’s best food.

2019-01-09T17:57:14+00:00January 10th, 2019|Categories: Featured, Regions, South, Southeast, Trends & Trails|Tags: , |0 Comments

Mississippi Delta Tamales

The tamale really is an odd little food item. Stewed meat is wrapped in some sort of mushy corn meal and rolled up in inedible corn husks. Don’t try to eat the whole thing like a dolmathakia, the Greek delicacy of stuffed grape leaves. There are better ways to get your daily fiber allotment. But to some foodies, especially those who grew up eating tamales, they’re an object of obsession. Most folks probably associate tamales with Mexican food and those tamales usually use masa flour as the main ingredient and are served at both breakfast and dinner. In the Mississippi Delta, however, a uniquely American brand of tamales is made using cornmeal and pork, beef, chicken or turkey. These tamales are often packed by the dozen in plastic jars or coffee cans and sold on the front counter of convenience stores or gas stations.

2018-12-27T15:09:04+00:00December 27th, 2018|Categories: Cuisines, Featured, Regions, South, Southern|Tags: |0 Comments

Iconic Foods of North Carolina

Every state has an iconic food. Think of Maryland and your mind goes to crab cakes, Pennsylvania and it’s a juicy Philly Cheese steak, West Virginia (yes, West Virginia, hey, it’s my home state, I have to show it a little love) has pepperoni rolls, and in North Carolina, it’s barbecue. While these foods may be the first to come to mind, they’re by no means the only foods worth note. Take North Carolina, my adopted home state, as an example. Yeah, we’ve got barbecue—two styles and a dozen great places for each—but with more than 300 miles of coastline we have exceptional seafood, and every ethnic group that’s called this state home has left a greasy thumbprint on our food culture. So, if you’ve got a hankering for some of the iconic foods of North Carolina, here’s my list of where to start.

2018-12-13T18:29:35+00:00December 18th, 2018|Categories: Coastal, Cuisines, Featured, Regions, South, Southeast|Tags: |0 Comments

Réveillon Dinners

Once you pass underneath the gateway arch at the foot of Federal Hill, you’re in Providence, Rhode Island’s Little Italy. Classic red sauce restaurants—some of which date back a century—line Atwells Avenue. In between, there are Italian specialty shops where dried sausages hang in the windows while songs by old crooners are piped out into the street. There are bocce courts, and an Italianate fountain in DePasquale Square with twinkling lights hanging overhead. This time of year, there’s also a huge Christmas tree illuminating the piazza. If you can catch it during one of the season’s first snowfalls, you’re not likely to find a more magical scene.

2018-12-05T21:46:02+00:00December 11th, 2018|Categories: Featured, South, Trends & Trails|Tags: , |0 Comments

Happy Thanksgiving

All of us here at Foodie Travel USA wish everyone a very happy Thanksgiving.  We’d like to take this opportunity to say a simple “thank you” for reading our posts. We hope you enjoy reading it as much as we enjoy putting it together and digging into flavors from coast to coast. While gearing up for the holiday, some of us stopped to reflect and share memories, insights and even some home-cooking tips from past Thanksgivings.

Thanksgiving Culinary Traditions

Dressing or stuffing? Pumpkin or sweet potato pie? Brine, baste, roast or deep-fry the bird? What you consider to be the “correct” answer to these and other culinary questions about our nation’s annual Thanksgiving feast depend largely on where you live.

10 Foodie Experiences from Classic Movies

“I'll have what she's having” is arguably one of the most recognized lines in movie history. Rob Reiner and Nora Ephron's 1989 “When Harry Met Sally” humorously explores the difference between men and woman and whether or not they can really be friends. Sally, played by Meg Ryan, is depicted as a picky eater who wants things the way she wants them. She's eating a deli sandwich in the classic scene, proof that movie food scenes layer theme into cuisine.

Louisiana-Grown Rice

“Have a rice day” is the greeting you'll get in Crowley, Louisiana. Rice has reigned in this self-proclaimed “rice capital” of the Cajun prairie since the late 1800s. Crowley's rice history goes back to the completion of the railroad, which led to the sale of abundant prairie land rich for growing the crop. Several advances in equipment, technology and plant varieties all led to the grain prospering in this region of Southwest Louisiana. Rice fields still dot the landscape today.

Harvest and Heritage in Lubbock, Texas

The mention of Lubbock usually raises questions on where the city is located; even the fact that it is in the state of Texas typically garners curious looks. It may be overshadowed by many of the bigger, more popular cities in the nation’s second-largest state, but it’s a foodie travel destination worth notice. This southwestern gem has a surprisingly long history of agriculture as well as food and wine to sample.

2018-11-13T20:08:31+00:00September 20th, 2018|Categories: Americana, Cuisines, Featured, Regions, South|Tags: , |0 Comments

Four Tasty Chuck Wagon Cook-offs

Combine engaging travel with hearty, satisfying comfort food at a chuck wagon cook-off—it’s a tasty way to experience one culinary element of the iconic American West’s cowboy/cattleman culture. Dozens of chuck wagon cooking competitions, or cook-offs, take place every year; most occur in western states though they can be found throughout the U.S. According to native Texan and amateur historian Roger Edison, the chuck wagon was invented in 1866 by Texan Charles Goodnight, a rancher trying to find a way to keep his cowboys well-fed during cattle drives that sometimes lasted several months. Goodnight rigged a sturdy army surplus wagon with a large upright wooden pantry box and a hinged door with hinged legs that could be laid flat to serve as a food preparation table. It proved to be an effective way to hold and transport barrels of bulk foodstuffs and other supplies.

2018-12-06T17:06:48+00:00August 21st, 2018|Categories: Americana, Cuisines, Featured, Regions, South, Southeast|Tags: |0 Comments